High risk

Early on in the pandemic I wrote a piece that described Amazon as America’s new Red Cross. A story I came across today underlines that point. How many other ecommerce players make the news when deliveries are slow? From CBS LA:

Residents in two Ventura County cities say their Amazon Prime service has suddenly become sluggishly slow without explanation.

Rosalinda Rodriguez of Moorpark is paralyzed from the chest down. Though she uses a wheelchair to get around, she relies on delivery services like Amazon for convenience and safety.

“I am at high risk if I do contract coronavirus because I do have a spinal cord injury,” Rodriguez said.

She pays $119 a year for an Amazon Prime membership so she can get her orders in one to two days. But about a month ago, her amazon deliveries suddenly slowed.

“So now if I try to place an order it will take anywhere from seven to 10 days,” she said.

There was a time when “seven to 10 days” was something of an ecommerce miracle. Now, anything beyond one or two days, and Amazon is held up as putting people’s health — life! — at risk. Amazon wouldn’t tell CBS LA why deliveries had slowed, but did say it was seeking to increase capacity in the area.

AOC on Twitch

Over the course of around three hours on Tuesday, more than 700,000 people checked out Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s debut on Amazon’s Twitch. Or, in other words:

I’ve had the discussion many times about what happens when popular streamers decide they want to go into politics. We’ve seen it with some members of the alt-right.

Much more interesting, though, is what happens when politicians decide they want to go into streaming. There’s small window here: too much gaming will reflect badly on the country’s most in demand congressperson in a district that needs all of her attention. But still, grasping these platforms unlocks an entire generation of voter.